Toronto magazine ranks “female lawyers” according to Looks

Narcity

I was taking a break from court today when a friend sent me a link to an article that is so cringe-worthy and blatantly sexist that I could barely read it.

Narcity, a Toronto lifestyle magazine, penned this ridiculous piece entitled “16 of Toronto’s most Beautiful Female Lawyers”.  The author, Nicole Kalashnikova, writes:

There is no stronger force than a beautiful lady who knows her rights. I mean, who could resist a beautiful woman in the courtroom? These ladies have got the looks, the knowledge and the attitude to prove your innocence.  Here is a list of Toronto’s most beautiful female lawyers that will use their time, dedication, passion and beauty to sweep the judge off the bench.

The article displays the photos of 16 lawyers, along with their names and practice areas. The photos have been taken from their professional LinkedIn profiles or their law firm websites, and some of the lawyers are even wearing their official court robes.

A source has confirmed that at least two of the lawyers in this list were included without their permission or knowledge.

While I am sure Kalashnikova thinks this piece is funny, it is just pathetic and sexist. Newsflash, it is 2016. Females are lawyers, and the correct term is “lawyer”, not “female lawyer”. We have worked hard to get to where we are in a profession that is still largely male-dominated. Law is not what you have seen in the movie “Legally Blonde”. Looks do not matter – your legal arguments and hard work do.

I welcome Kalashnikova to join me at my next “Young Women in Law” event so that she can meet some amazing, brilliant lawyers, and get over her stereotypes of women in the legal profession.

From career change to maternity leave – why career coaching makes sense

 

Lawyers are used to helping their clients solve their problems. It’s our job, and we take pride in it. In a busy law practice environment with a seemingly endless stream of emails, calls and last minute crisis moments, lawyers don’t often take the time to focus on themselves.

Sheena MacAskill is a lawyer who has carved out a career path for herself coaching lawyers. But wait, aren’t lawyers supposed to have it all figured out when it comes to their careers? We graduate law school, join firms as associates, work hard and then make partner, right?

As it turns out, it isn’t that easy, and legal careers these days can take many unexpected turns and can come in different shapes and sizes. This is where someone like Sheena comes in. A former big law lawyer, Sheena has coached many lawyers through major career events like a lay off or a career change, to major life events like becoming a parent.

I first met Sheena at an event hosted by Young Women in Law, where she shared some tips about how to ace a performance evaluation at work (tip, don’t be afraid to brag about your achievements and take credit!).  She made a really good point that I think everyone should print out and frame on their desk, “you are the only person who will take care of your career, don’t expect others to.”

When you let your career go on auto pilot, or wait for others to recognize you and give you promotions, you can easily end up stuck in a job you do not like. Sheena’s advice is to write a list of career goals for the year, and keep it somewhere front and center where you can check it as often as you check your email. Be accountable to yourself.

It isn’t just major career events that lawyers sometimes need guidance to get them through, it is also major life events too. Sheena offers maternity leave coaching for women, to help them set up their practices for leave and prepare for the new work life balancing act ahead.

As a new mother myself, I can see how a service like that could be very useful, especially if you are in a small firm or are a sole practitioner.

Regardless of the stage you are at in your career, career coaching can be very useful.

 

Law Society Initiative aims to retain women in law

 

If you take a look at the average law school class in any school in this country, you will notice at least half the students are women. This is a great improvement from decades past. However, when you take a look at your average private practice, you won’t typically see this kind of gender parity.

The attrition of women from the legal profession is an issue of great concern. This is especially the case in private practice, where the drop-off of women is the most significant. While women make up around 50% of law graduates, on average they make up only around 34% of lawyers in private practice.

Thankfully, this situation is not being ignored. In 2008 in Ontario, the Law Society of Upper Canada launched the Justicia Project, a project designed to examine and support the retention of women in law. It has been a success thus far, with 57 participating law firms and inspiring the creation of similar projects in other provinces.

I recently had the opportunity to speak with Janet Minor, Treasurer of the LSUC, and Josée Bouchard, Director of Equity Initiatives of the LSUC about the beginnings of this project, what it has achieved thus far and where it is headed.

The Justicia Project (background can be found here) was launched to address the problem of women leaving the legal profession in numbers that were widely disproportionate to men. While lawyers leave law practice all the time for a variety of reasons, it was clear there was a cause behind the high numbers of women bowing out from law.

Initially, the Project commenced focus groups and consultations to explore and determine the reasons behind the attrition women from law. The studies found that responsibilities and pressures that come with balancing law and family were a big reason why women left law. While all working parents struggle to find balance, the demanding and time-intensive nature of law can make it especially challenging.

The Project wanted to address this cause through engaging law firms across Ontario and providing them with resources to help them retain and empower women. These resources include manuals, policies and guidebooks, which you can check out on the Law Society of Upper Canada’s website here.   The resources cover a variety of useful topics, like a Guide to assist lawyers and firms in developing flexible work arrangements and a Guide for helping forms prepare for the parental and maternal leave of lawyers.

As a new parent myself, I am particularly interested in the toolkit for new parents and information about how to set your practice up while you are on leave and what to do when you return. What to do with demanding clients and files while on maternity leave is a top question of mind for many lawyers planning to start a family.

One of the goals of the Project was to encourage firms to develop standard policies and practices surrounding maternity and parental leave, rather than the ad-hoc policies many firms adhere to. For example, many female lawyers simply negotiate their own personal maternity leave arrangement with their firm, so the practices become ad-hoc instead of standardized. With these resources, many firms now have the tools to integrate policies into their firms.

The Project also facilitates workshops, conducts research and hosts events focussed on equality issues designed to equip women with key professional skills to help them succeed. The next event will be on October 29thdetails can be found here.

It is a little too early to see what the overall impact the Justicia Project has had on the legal profession, but so far the numbers look promising. Since 2000, there has been a 10% increase in the number of women in law.

There is still plenty of work to be done to retain women in law, but progress is being made, no small thanks to projects like Justicia.

By: Kathryn Marshall

Organization Profile: Young Women In Law

 

YWIL

There are many organizations within the legal profession targeted to women, from networking groups to speaker series. These are great, but they tend to attract more senior lawyers and cover issues that are relevant to that age/experience demographic. Overall, there is a lack of groups specifically geared towards junior women lawyers who are in the first years of their practice – a time when they need support and guidance the most.

That’s what makes Young Women In Law (YWL) a standout group. They are a Toronto based organization that specifically focuses on women in the first stage of their legal careers.

I recently had the chance to speak with Erica Young, a Toronto commercial litigator and President of YWL.  As Young points out, there are many organizations devoted to women in law, but there is a lack of specific attention to young women in the first few years of their practice. YWL aims to fill that gap – members must either be under 40 or in the first 5 years of their career.

YWL was founded 10 years ago by 10 young women in law who saw there was a need to promote and support newly called female lawyers. They have 250-300 members and it costs 100 dollars annually to be a member. While the organization is based in Toronto – it is open to all Canadian lawyers and articled students.

While many ‘women in law’ organizations cover more broad topics like general work life balance issues, YWL hosts speaker events on more specific topics geared to their audience of novice lawyers. These topics include things like navigating career paths, from work assignments to negotiating salary and raises. An important topic that YWL recently addressed was maternity leave – every firm does it differently but there is a lack of public information out there for lawyers looking to find out more. In many cases, the terms of a maternity leave (length, top-up, etc.) is something a lawyer may have to negotiate – taking into account many different factors.

According to Young, the top challenges facing women in law include finding quality mentorship and the attrition of women in the legal profession. They won’t be solved over night, but these are two challenges that will hopefully become easier thanks to groups like YWIL.

By: Kathryn Marshall