Inside a Call to the Bar Ceremony

Last week I was called to the Bar in Ontario (my second Call ceremony since I am called in BC). Bar Call ceremonies are events  filled with tradition and history, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t room for some modern flare. This year the Law Society of Upper Canada encouraged Bar Call participants to post photos and videos of the ceremony on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram using the hashtag #Called2015.

It added some fun to an otherwise serious affair, with people taking goofy selfies and posting fun photos online. Here is a timeline of photos I took to document the day:

 

8

The day kicked off at Roy Thompson Hall in downtown Toronto, where excited lawyers-to-be congregated outside wearing their robes, tabs, court shirts and vets with grey or black pants/skirts. This look never goes out of style!

2

Roy Thompson Hall is packed and the opening speeches and keynote address have been given. The candidates for the Call to the Bar are called individually and presented to the Treasurer by members of the Convocation, which include Law Society Benchers, Judges and other distinguished guests.

3

After all the candidates are Called, the Convocation adjourns and a special sitting of the Court of Appeal and the Superior Court of Justice takes place immediately, where the newly called lawyers swear their oaths.

5

Let the festivities begin! Ontario now has some newly-minted lawyers, and some very excited family and friends.

12037982_10102389459845691_7643013343879225499_n

All in all, it was a great day!

By: Kathryn Marshall

 

 

 

 

Organization Profile: Young Women In Law

 

YWIL

There are many organizations within the legal profession targeted to women, from networking groups to speaker series. These are great, but they tend to attract more senior lawyers and cover issues that are relevant to that age/experience demographic. Overall, there is a lack of groups specifically geared towards junior women lawyers who are in the first years of their practice – a time when they need support and guidance the most.

That’s what makes Young Women In Law (YWL) a standout group. They are a Toronto based organization that specifically focuses on women in the first stage of their legal careers.

I recently had the chance to speak with Erica Young, a Toronto commercial litigator and President of YWL.  As Young points out, there are many organizations devoted to women in law, but there is a lack of specific attention to young women in the first few years of their practice. YWL aims to fill that gap – members must either be under 40 or in the first 5 years of their career.

YWL was founded 10 years ago by 10 young women in law who saw there was a need to promote and support newly called female lawyers. They have 250-300 members and it costs 100 dollars annually to be a member. While the organization is based in Toronto – it is open to all Canadian lawyers and articled students.

While many ‘women in law’ organizations cover more broad topics like general work life balance issues, YWL hosts speaker events on more specific topics geared to their audience of novice lawyers. These topics include things like navigating career paths, from work assignments to negotiating salary and raises. An important topic that YWL recently addressed was maternity leave – every firm does it differently but there is a lack of public information out there for lawyers looking to find out more. In many cases, the terms of a maternity leave (length, top-up, etc.) is something a lawyer may have to negotiate – taking into account many different factors.

According to Young, the top challenges facing women in law include finding quality mentorship and the attrition of women in the legal profession. They won’t be solved over night, but these are two challenges that will hopefully become easier thanks to groups like YWIL.

By: Kathryn Marshall